Archives: January 2011

Coffee, Tea, or ?

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Women are like teabags.

We don’t know our true strength until we are in hot water!
— Eleanor Roosevelt

 

The nation is in “hot water.” Each of us is being called to become clearer in our convictions, stronger in our faith, and more determined with our footsteps. None of us has a moral obligation to live our best life or help each other, but for most women those character traits come with two X chromosomes. We’re natural born nurturers—and we need strength to keep going and giving and loving and forgiving.

 

Tea not your thing? That’s okay; that’s the beauty of being in hot water. There’s coffee, hot chocolate, and Theraflu! All three mix wonderfully with hot water. There’s lemonade and jello and powdered milk and concrete. The flavors and possibilities are endless.

 

We don’t all need to drink tea. Each of us has our own preferences, our own beliefs, and our own values. If you were serving tea and someone wanted coffee, wouldn’t you do your best to accommodate them? Most hostesses would.

 

What divides us as a nation is not as strong as what unites us. Our strength lies in accommodating and serving a variety of flavors—no matter what you prefer in your own cup.

Reducing Stress the Swedish Way

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     When I first began teaching Stress Management for Women in 2000 I hated it! I was a full-time career woman traveling every other week while raising three kids. I loved my job and I loved my kids, but I wasn’t about to pretend I was an expert and stress-free just because I was teaching the topic! The more honest I was with my students, the less stressed we all became, and the topic has become one of my favorites to train. Through a series of exercises, we tackled our stress together.

 

     This Swedish proverb reminded me of an exercise we did to help cut through the feelings of being overwhelmed, of being unable to identify the true causes: The More Of/Less Of exercise.

 

     On a sheet of paper, list everything you “want more of” in your life. Then make of list of everything you “want less of” in your life. Take each item on both lists seriously. Brainstorm and figure out ways to tackle each item individually.

 

     If you don’t know where to start, start with this proverb.

Words to Live by

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    Number 9 of the “24 Interludes of Life” as shared on Telling It Like It Is, a site which promotes “things you need to know about raising children, relationships, marriage and parenting.”

 

A careless word may kindle a strife
A cruel word may wreck a life
A timely word may level stress
A lovely word may heal and bless

 

What if all of your words were lovely?