Archives: February 2012

Travel Time Equals Unravel Time

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   Ever notice how some people get all worked up over a little travel? Mention “airport” to a friend of mine and she immediately breaks into a sweat. She hates navigating the check-in and security lines. Abhors having to wade through all the people. She’s so intent on getting from Point A to Point B that she misses the sites entirely—including the beautiful artwork and cultural displays that many airports have provided for the entertainment and engagement of passers-by.  

   I’m the opposite. I love a road-trip. If that trip includes planes, trains, and automobiles, so much the better. The trick to traveling light and carelessly (without a care) is to: 1) take your heart with you, and 2) leave your cares at home.

Take Your Heart

   The people you hold dear need to come with you—metaphorically of course (unless you’re lucky enough to have them as your traveling companions). Your partner, your kids, your best friends, your parents… Figure out a way to connect with them while you’re gone. Texting is a great substitute for a live phone conversation—and often it’s easier than trying to hear in a crowd. Even beyond that, talk with them in your head. Keep them in your thoughts and prayers. Set the point in time when you’ll know you’ll see them again and then vow to enjoy every minute of your adventure until time leads you there. If you keep them fully in your heart and take them with you, you won’t have a driving need to get home. “Home” is with you.

Leave your Cares at Home

   It’s amazing what a week away will cure. If it’s a big enough concern, it’ll be waiting for you when you get back, but sometimes “time” works a problem through without you having to do a thing. Being on-the-road is relief from the everyday mundane routine that keeps some people engrossed in their problems and stuck in old thinking. They’re in-a-rut. Travel helps to open up new perspectives. New scenery, unfamiliar streets, unknown restaurants, different faces and places. You just might have a different perspective upon re-entry. What was important before might be insignificant upon your return.

   Let go of any preconceived notions on how your trip will go. It’s a stellar day when the weather is fine, the flight is on time, and your rental car has cruise control. But when the challenges set in—delayed flights, turbulent skies, lost reservations, no gps, embrace it and move forward. Your only need is to relax, enjoy the moment, and let your thoughts unravel.